Overhead Conveyor Streamlines Instrument Panel Production

Overhead Conveyor Streamlines Instrument Panel Production

Overhead Conveyor Streamlines Instrument Panel Production Nearly 1 mile of overhead, enclosed conveyor track at Guelph Products links sequential manufacturing steps and provides transport of parts to a just-in-time (JIT) staging area prior to shipment. The track is installed at Geulph Products’ 200,000 sq. ft. manufacturing plant in Guelph Products, Ontario, located 45 miles from Chrysler’s main assembly plant in Bramalea, Ontario. Guelph, a division of Chrysler, manufactures instrument panels, door panels and steering columns for the Chrysler Eagle Premier. To streamline the productions process, the plant partially assembles 350 instrument panels daily. The 25 lb. panels are maintained up to 1-1/2 days prior to final assembly and shipment to the main vehicle assembly line. Providing continuous flow The PAC-LINE™ conveyor system provides continuous flow of parts from a preliminary manufacturing area, through processing and subassembly stages, to the storage and accumulation area. Maximum conveyor travel speed is 24 feet per minute. The system consists of four individual conveyor lines for paint, wash storage accumulation, and storage and delivery. Each line performs an important function in the manufacturing process, explains Dick Carter, maintenance superintendent. The 700 sq. ft. long paint line transports panel components through a spray booth where a protective coating is applied to the parts. Special fixtures mounted on 24″ centers carry the vinyl instrument panel skins along the line. A separate 130 ft. long line processes smaller parts. The enclosed track design prevents the coating from reaching the conveyor chain or bearings. The 700 ft. long wash line conveys the panels through a ceiling mounted wash tunnel. The automated line keeps the parts clean by minimizing manual handling. The...
How to Store 1,000 Parts in 100 Square Feet of Floor Space

How to Store 1,000 Parts in 100 Square Feet of Floor Space

How to Store 1,000 Parts in 100 Square Feet of Floor Space In both manufacturing and warehousing, workers are constantly challenged with minimizing floor space requirements while maximizing storage capacity. Typical solutions may include installing in a few extra racks at the end of a busy aisleway, double-stacking skids on already-filled shelves or narrowing aisleways to place more product on the floor. In doing so, they must still safely maneuver and coordinate a multitude of forklifts around blind corners, and across pedestrian walkways, and track storage locations, which are constantly changing due to lack of space and shuffling of skids in small spaces. The Challenge This particular company was one of several located on Toyota’s supplier campus. They had been selected by Toyota to supply the foam seat cushions for the Tundra pickup truck. These foam seat cushions are produced through a molding process that involves a 90-minute cure time. During the cure time, the cushions must sit at room temperature with minimal handling to ensure a top quality product. The Toyota seat supplier needed a solution that would not only minimize handling during transport and curing but also store up to 2,600 parts during curing. In addition, since much of the floor space in the production facility was already allotted for other process machinery, there was very little space left for the curing and storage process. The PACLINE CONVEYOR Solution In many manufacturing environments, such as this one, the space below the ceiling trusses, light fixtures, piping and HVAC and above the floor machinery is unused. Since most operations are conducted on or close to the ground level,...