Conveyor Offers Many Advantages to Woodworking

Conveyor Offers Many Advantages to Woodworking

An overhead conveyor offers many advantages over other methods of moving parts between various manufacturing operations. It can transport items through areas not accessible to workers, such as automatic spray booths and drying ovens, or where hazardous conditions exist. The weight carrying capacity is greater than any employee, and it does it without tiring or taking breaks. Often an enclosed overhead conveyor can be installed where a floor conveyor would be impractical. When there is a need to temporarily hold work-in-progress, carriers can be switched to recirculating loops or storage spurs until needed. Safety devices can be installed on inclined sections to control runaway carriers in the event of chain breakage. Specializing in overhead conveyors for woodworking applications, PACLINE’s pre-engineered standard conveyor components feature an enclosed-track design and bolt-together construction. The conveyor chain travels within an enclosed track, where it is protected from the plant environment. The extremely low-friction design of the chain makes it possible to power long systems from a single drive. Because the drive system is one of the most important components, PACLINE conveyors incorporate a unique caterpillar drive unit, which can be placed in most the convenient location. It is not restricted to corner placement, as is typical in many systems. Another feature of PACLINE systems is the elimination of sprocket turns that, in addition to being dangerous, are also costly and difficult to install and maintain. Published in Canadian Woodworking, November 1989 GET MORE INFORMATION   Your Name (required): Your Company: Your Phone: Your Email (required): Tell us about your project: This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service...
Handling Furniture of Multiple Shapes Through Multiple Finishing Processes

Handling Furniture of Multiple Shapes Through Multiple Finishing Processes

The process of building wooden furniture has numerous steps, many of which have little to do with the actual construction.  A large aspect of the assembling chairs, tables, kitchen cabinets and several similar items is the finishing stage, which is a multi-phase procedure that includes multiple spraying and sanding steps.  Next to overall style, the finish – stain or paint – is the most highly visible criteria of a potential consumer. The Challenge For one furniture manufacturer, the finishing stage of their process was causing a bottleneck in their process.  Having only one spray booth, workers were continually moving chairs, tables, desks and dresser units in and out of the single booth on manual push carts.  With their high quality, four-coat stain finish, furniture pieces had to be stored around the plant for curing between coats and intermediate sanding steps.  With all the shuffling of carts, valuable time and floor space were not used efficiently and it was difficult to keep track of all the partially stained furniture staged around the building. Furniture pieces could be cut, milled, assembled and sanded at a higher rate than they could be stained, resulting in lowered production rates.  Because the furniture varied greatly in size and weight (from 5 lbs. – 200 lbs.), many items were cumbersome to move manually through the various finishing processes. A system was needed that would eliminate the bottleneck, increase production rates, minimize handling and reduce “work in progress” storage space. The PAC-TRAK™ Towline Conveyor Solution To create a viable solution, the furniture manufacturer would require additional spray booths in the plant; no system could run effectively with...
Inexpensive Overhead Conveyor for Small Wood Shop

Inexpensive Overhead Conveyor for Small Wood Shop

Small shop owners don’t realize the tremendous payback they can enjoy by adding a paint line conveyor to their operation. I recently attended the AWFS show in Las Vegas, where I met over 200 wood industry professionals, many of whom were the owners of small shops. Many visitors seemed to approach me with caution, saying, “I’m only a small shop, I don’t have the type of cash needed for automating.” This intrigued me. Many small shop owners were clearly unaware of the cost of our monorail conveyor systems and were quick to jump to the conclusion that any conveyor equipment was prohibitively expensive. I changed my approach on the second day of the show, immediately discussing with visitors the cost of a 100 foot and 200 foot system. That changed everything. They stayed longer and they came back later in the show for a second look. PACLINE has worked with several small wood shops. To show you how automation might benefit your operation I would like to share with you the recent experience of one of our customers – Contract Supply Inc. Contract Supply (CS) manufactures chairs and tables primarily for the restaurant and hotel industry. They also handle large volume refurbishing and refinishing of chairs and tables. This company was at a stage where they needed to take on larger orders with inherently lower margins. Because of the low margins, CS needed to be highly efficient with production costs, and with the larger size orders they could not afford any rework. One problem, and he would be ‘in the red’. CS normally processed chairs in batches, and they needed...
Overhead Conveyors for Small Wood Shops

Overhead Conveyors for Small Wood Shops

When it was time for expansion this wood finisher thought ‘over the top’. Small and mid-sized furniture manufacturers are often threatened with high volume, low margin orders, meanwhile, small facilities and manual handling methods can lead to disastrous quality and financial results. Canadian furniture supplier Contract Supply based in Mississauga, ON needed to automate its finishing operation in an already tight space. Contract Supply (CS) has manufactured chairs and tables for the restaurant and hotel industry for over 20 years. Within their 65,000 square foot facility, CS handles all design, upholstery, assembly and finishing operations. As with most small and mid-sized furniture manufacturers, these processes were generally done manually. The company supplies high quality wood and metal products primarily to the commercial food service market including: hotels and resorts, restaurants, food courts, shopping malls, libraries, schools and healthcare facilities. They will even tackle large volume refurbishing and refinishing of customer’s existing chairs and tables. As business grew for CS so did the size of their jobs and eventually, CS was faced with the following production issues: There was a need to increase volume to accommodate the larger customers; Current space was limited; Their (wood) finishing process in particular (from sanding, staining, sealing and lacquering) was ‘back breaking’ and time consuming; Smaller ‘special’ batch jobs were still an important part of the business. Shopping for ideas Eugene Honcharuk, president of Contract Supply knew something had to be done to meet production demands and maintain efficiency so he went to a trade show to shop for ideas. One option Honcharuk was presented with was a cart-type floor conveyor system to move...